The “Red Star” Train Graveyard has been abandoned

A wide region on the outskirts of Budapest is inhabited by abandoned locomotives and railway wagons. The Red Star Train Graveyard, formerly known as Istvántelek, is located here.

This depot was constructed as a national railway maintenance facility in the early twentieth century. In 1902, one of the factory halls was Budapest’s largest structure, measuring 24,000 square meters (28,704 square yards).

By Laurie Mitchell, myradiantcity.com

During its existence, the depot was quite busy. Older wagons and locomotives were taken there for repair or restoration before being moved to the Budapest Railway Museum, in addition to serving operating trains.

However, WWII and the demise of steam trains took their toll on the depot, and it was progressively abandoned, while the southern section is still utilized for contemporary train repair. Due to a lack of money, it appears that many of the locomotives planned for the museum were just abandoned where they were.

By Laurie Mitchell, myradiantcity.com

The collection of dilapidated trains is quite varied and can prove fascinating for those interested in trains. The site comprises two large depots, a few smaller sheds, and then a wide-open area where trains are left at the mercy of the elements.

At this site alone, visitors can see more than 100 locomotives and railway carriages. The Red Star Train Graveyard includes rare Hungarian MAV 424 steam engines, German freight cars, and Soviet cars from the 1960s.

By Laurie Mitchell, myradiantcity.com

Intrepid explorers can unearth ancient railway tickets within some of the newer cars. A red star on the front of a handful of Hungarian steam engines is how the location gained its moniker among the locals.

Intrepid explorers can unearth ancient railway tickets within some of the newer cars. A red star on the front of a handful of Hungarian steam engines is how the location gained its moniker among the locals.

The Red Star Train Graveyard has been overgrown with vegetation over time, and the trains have rusted, but that hasn’t stopped it from becoming a distinctive local attraction. The location appeals to individuals who enjoy abandoned locations as well as those who are interested in trains and history.

Aside from the abandoned trains, there is some interesting railway infrastructure, such as brick and wood viewing towers and painted signage positioned along the length of the station.

By Laurie Mitchell, myradiantcity.com

Trespassers can easily be spotted because the southern end of the property is still in use. There is also a barbed wire barrier surrounding the perimeter to navigate.

In the summer of 2017, it was reported that guards and dogs had been added to the security measures, making entry to the site even more difficult. However, if you have the necessary documentation, you can still gain access.

Laurie Mitchell took the incredible photographs of the abandoned train yard in Hungary for her urban blog, My Radiant City. Laurie has spent the last four years traveling across the world.

Laurie’s blog is about living without a car, chronicling historical events, saving historic structures, and establishing livable communities for everybody. To view more of her work, you should go to her lovely website.

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